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Biodiversity

Renewable energy development and biodiversity protection can go hand in hand.

Stepping stones for change

Better Energy is on a green journey to change the way our society is powered. We want to take full responsibility for the land we use in a wider context. Solar is unique as a renewable power source because it can combine clean energy production and native species and habitat conservation. With careful research and planning, solar plant sites can help restore and conserve nature, increase biodiversity and support healthy ecosystems. Solar plant sites can serve as important stepping stones to help reverse the trend of declining biodiversity.

From vision to impact

Better Energy’s new initiative for greater biodiversity will be first rolled out as a pilot project in the Blangslev solar plant in Denmark. The landscaping of Blangslev to support greater biodiversity is carefully planned in context of the surroundings. After a thorough local environmental study, nine distinct biodiversity ’points of impact’ will be incorporated in the solar plant site to ensure nature has good opportunities to spread and thrive over the years.

1. The fruit grove

The fruit grove offers a different kind of windbreak vegetation. The focus of this area is fruit and berry-bearing trees and shrubs that benefit both people and wildlife. Neighbours and visitors are welcome to come by and pick fruits and berries, and the remaining fruit provides food for birds, insects and other animals in the area.

2. The overlook

Excess topsoil from other areas is moved here to create a small hill – an overlook of the solar plant and the surrounding countryside. Tables and benches will be placed on the lookout, creating a meeting place with a view. Piling up large stones on the sunny southern slope of the hill creates a warm microhabitat for cold-blooded animals, insects and plants that thrive in the heat.

3. The bog

The bog located just outside the solar plant border can be seen from the boardwalk, providing visitors with a chance to experience the bog and its inhabitants. A platform jutting out from the boardwalk invites visitors to stop and direct their attention to the bog and the various species and natural dynamics that play out there.

4. The meadow

The meadow slopes down from dryer, sun-exposed areas to lower, moist areas. The terrain differences that already exist are exaggerated by working with the soil. At the lowest point, soil is removed to strengthen the wetland character. At the top of the slope, the nutrient-rich topsoil is removed to enhance the dry and nutrient poor conditions. Where soil is removed, different suitable seed-mixes are sown.

5. The lowland

The existing wet conditions in the lowland are strengthened by removing soil from the lowest areas. This enhances the wet biotope that would have existed here without the land drainage that was required for agriculture. In the spring the lowland will be periodically flooded, creating a perfect habitat for local amphibians to breed. Tall native perennials are planted here, but space is also left for the local flora to emerge.

6. The forest garden

The forest garden is an experimental approach to agroecology which combines a natural forest and an orchard, with an underbrush of mostly edible wild plants. The forest garden is a multilayered garden with trees, shrubs and herbs where visitors and neighbours can harvest the seasonal wild fruits, berries and herbs. The forest garden also provides food and habitats for wildlife like birds, insects and other smaller animals.

7. The forest edge

A light, open forest edge is re-established on the western side of the existing forest reserve. The structure of the forest edge is established with intermediate young trees and bushes to create a gradual transition from the open grassland to the dense forest. This structure protects the existing forest climate and makes it a preferred habitat for many species due to the combination of both light and shelter.

8. The grassland

A grassland is established under the power lines. This grassland will provide food and shelter for insects and birds from the open farmland, such as partridges and skylarks. In some places, the nutrient rich topsoil is removed, and hardy flowering species are sown. The excess soil is used to create small elevations in the landscape. On the high voltage masts, nesting boxes for kestrels are fastened.

9. The sandbank

The late glacial deposition of sand at Blangslev is exposed to create a nutrient-poor island in the former cultivated field. The glacial sand differs from the soil in the rest of the area by the higher sand content and the lower nutrient levels, which create special conditions for a habitat that differs from the surroundings. Groups of large rocks accumulate heat, creating a warmer microclimate for heat-tolerant species.

1. The fruit grove
2. The overlook
3. The bog
4. The meadow
5. The lowland
6. The forest garden
7. The forest edge
8. The grassland
9. The sandbank

Blangslev

Solar plant sites can serve as important stepping stones to help reconnect nature and increase biodiversity. Read about our nine points of impact at Blangslev.

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